Asteroid Zips By Orion

This image shows the potentially hazardous near-Earth object 1998 KN3 as it zips past a cloud of dense gas and dust near the Orion nebula. NEOWISE, the asteroid-hunting portion of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, mission, snapped infrared pictures of the asteroid, seen as the yellow-green dot at upper left. Because asteroids are warmed by the sun to roughly room temperature, they glow brightly at the infrared wavelengths used by WISE.
Astronomers use infrared light from asteroids to measure their sizes, and when combined with visible-light observations, they can also measure the reflectivity of their surfaces. The WISE infrared data reveal that this asteroid is about .7 mile (1.1 kilometers) in diameter and reflects only about 7 percent of the visible light that falls on its surface, which means it is relatively dark.
In this image, blue denotes shorter infrared wavelengths, and red, longer. Hotter objects emit shorter-wavelength light, so they appear blue. The blue stars, for example, have temperatures of thousands of degrees. The coolest gas and dust appears red. The asteroid appears yellow in the image because it is about room temperature: cooler than the distant stars, but warmer than the dust.


Credit:  NASA/JPL-Caltech

Asteroid Zips By Orion

This image shows the potentially hazardous near-Earth object 1998 KN3 as it zips past a cloud of dense gas and dust near the Orion nebula. NEOWISE, the asteroid-hunting portion of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, mission, snapped infrared pictures of the asteroid, seen as the yellow-green dot at upper left. Because asteroids are warmed by the sun to roughly room temperature, they glow brightly at the infrared wavelengths used by WISE.

Astronomers use infrared light from asteroids to measure their sizes, and when combined with visible-light observations, they can also measure the reflectivity of their surfaces. The WISE infrared data reveal that this asteroid is about .7 mile (1.1 kilometers) in diameter and reflects only about 7 percent of the visible light that falls on its surface, which means it is relatively dark.

In this image, blue denotes shorter infrared wavelengths, and red, longer. Hotter objects emit shorter-wavelength light, so they appear blue. The blue stars, for example, have temperatures of thousands of degrees. The coolest gas and dust appears red. The asteroid appears yellow in the image because it is about room temperature: cooler than the distant stars, but warmer than the dust.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech


Posted 1 year ago with 132 notes
Tagged:AstronomyscienceOrion NebulaspacestarsasteroidNASA

  1. veftigin reblogged this from spaceplasma
  2. squishy-ass-witch reblogged this from physicscaucie
  3. aintshitt reblogged this from spaceplasma
  4. thin-pixelations reblogged this from spaceplasma
  5. genialbrilliance reblogged this from spaceplasma
  6. albusdumbdore reblogged this from physicscaucie
  7. saevitas reblogged this from physicscaucie
  8. physicscaucie reblogged this from spaceplasma
  9. slitsforeyes reblogged this from lookatthesefuckinstars
  10. camilllejade reblogged this from ne0ndreams
  11. elasticimaginaut reblogged this from spaceplasma
  12. tropicruel reblogged this from ne0ndreams
  13. perineum7 reblogged this from ne0ndreams
  14. jackwhiteforpresident1944 reblogged this from ne0ndreams
  15. stardustamity reblogged this from ne0ndreams
  16. ne0ndreams reblogged this from spaceplasma
  17. thescienceofficer reblogged this from spaceplasma
  18. inside-of-a-parallel-universe reblogged this from brightestofcentaurus
  19. my-kraken-perry reblogged this from theuniverseatlarge
  20. mattyostrow reblogged this from the-universe-nextdoor
  21. theuniverseatlarge reblogged this from starstuffblog
  22. tiny-owl-love reblogged this from starstuffblog
  23. starstuffblog reblogged this from spaceplasma
  24. booksandotherdrugs reblogged this from lookatthesefuckinstars
  25. the-universe-nextdoor reblogged this from lookatthesefuckinstars
  26. morningdew38 reblogged this from spaceplasma
  27. chocolatenick reblogged this from spaceplasma
  28. stevenismyangel reblogged this from spaceplasma
  29. ayyrawn reblogged this from lookatthesefuckinstars
  30. mtjack reblogged this from spaceplasma
  31. coffe3eyes reblogged this from lookatthesefuckinstars