The remarkable remains of a recent supernova

Scientists are getting a close-up X-ray view of G1.9+0.3, the most recent supernova known to have occurred in the Milky Way.
Astronomers estimate that a star explodes as a supernova in our galaxy on average about twice per century. In 2008, a team of scientists announced they discovered the remains of a supernova that is the most recent — in Earth’s timeframe — known to have occurred in the Milky Way. The explosion would have been visible from Earth a little more than a hundred years ago if it had not been heavily obscured by dust and gas. Its likely location is about 28,000 light-years from Earth near the center of the Milky Way. A long observation equivalent to more than 11 days of observations of its debris field, now known as the supernova remnant G1.9+0.3, with NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory is providing new details about this important event. The source of G1.9+0.3 was most likely a white dwarf star that underwent a thermonuclear detonation and was destroyed after merging with another white dwarf or pulling material from an orbiting companion star. This is a particular class of supernova explosions, known as type Ia, that are used as distance indicators in cosmology because they are so consistent in brightness and incredibly luminous. The explosion ejected stellar debris at high velocities, creating the supernova remnant that is seen today by Chandra and other telescopes. This new image is a composite from Chandra where low-energy X-rays are red, intermediate energies are green, and higher-energy ones are blue.

Full Article 

Credit: NASA/CXC/NCSU/K.Borkowski et al./DSS

The remarkable remains of a recent supernova

Scientists are getting a close-up X-ray view of G1.9+0.3, the most recent supernova known to have occurred in the Milky Way.

Astronomers estimate that a star explodes as a supernova in our galaxy on average about twice per century. In 2008, a team of scientists announced they discovered the remains of a supernova that is the most recent — in Earth’s timeframe — known to have occurred in the Milky Way.

The explosion would have been visible from Earth a little more than a hundred years ago if it had not been heavily obscured by dust and gas. Its likely location is about 28,000 light-years from Earth near the center of the Milky Way. A long observation equivalent to more than 11 days of observations of its debris field, now known as the supernova remnant G1.9+0.3, with NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory is providing new details about this important event.

The source of G1.9+0.3 was most likely a white dwarf star that underwent a thermonuclear detonation and was destroyed after merging with another white dwarf or pulling material from an orbiting companion star. This is a particular class of supernova explosions, known as type Ia, that are used as distance indicators in cosmology because they are so consistent in brightness and incredibly luminous.

The explosion ejected stellar debris at high velocities, creating the supernova remnant that is seen today by Chandra and other telescopes. This new image is a composite from Chandra where low-energy X-rays are red, intermediate energies are green, and higher-energy ones are blue.

Full Article

Credit: NASA/CXC/NCSU/K.Borkowski et al./DSS


Posted 9 months ago with 184 notes
Tagged:scienceAstronomyG1.9+0.3Supernovacosmoschandrastarswhite dwarf

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