Chandra, Spitzer study suggests black holes abundant among the earliest stars

The cosmic microwave background, shown at left in this illustration, is a flash of light that occurred when the young universe cooled enough for electrons and protons to form the first atoms. It contains slight temperature fluctuations that correspond to regions of slightly different densities, representing the seeds of all cosmic structure we see around us today. The universe then went dark for hundreds of millions of years until the first stars shone and the first black holes began accreting gas. A portion of the infrared and X-ray signals from these sources is preserved in the cosmic infrared background, or CIB, and its X-ray equivalent, the CXB. At least 20 percent of the structure in these backgrounds changes in concert, indicating that black hole activity was hundreds of times more intense in the early universe than it is today.
By comparing infrared and X-ray background signals across the same stretch of sky, an international team of astronomers has discovered evidence of a significant number of black holes that accompanied the first stars in the universe.


Using data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, which observes in the infrared, researchers have concluded one of every five sources contributing to the infrared signal is a black hole.
Full Article


Credit: Karen Teramura, UHIfA

Chandra, Spitzer study suggests black holes abundant among the earliest stars

The cosmic microwave background, shown at left in this illustration, is a flash of light that occurred when the young universe cooled enough for electrons and protons to form the first atoms. It contains slight temperature fluctuations that correspond to regions of slightly different densities, representing the seeds of all cosmic structure we see around us today. The universe then went dark for hundreds of millions of years until the first stars shone and the first black holes began accreting gas. A portion of the infrared and X-ray signals from these sources is preserved in the cosmic infrared background, or CIB, and its X-ray equivalent, the CXB. At least 20 percent of the structure in these backgrounds changes in concert, indicating that black hole activity was hundreds of times more intense in the early universe than it is today.

By comparing infrared and X-ray background signals across the same stretch of sky, an international team of astronomers has discovered evidence of a significant number of black holes that accompanied the first stars in the universe.

Using data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and NASA’s , which observes in the infrared, researchers have concluded one of every five sources contributing to the is a black hole.


Full Article

Credit: Karen Teramura, UHIfA


Posted 1 year ago with 150 notes
Tagged:chandraspitzer space telescopeAstronomyastrophysicsscienceuniversespacecosmoschandra x-ray observatory

  1. thestarsbeckon reblogged this from itsfullofstars
  2. imperiatrix reblogged this from itsfullofstars
  3. negotoism reblogged this from interglacial
  4. interglacial reblogged this from do-nothing
  5. bondagebakesaleon reblogged this from itsfullofstars
  6. derekauslino reblogged this from itsfullofstars
  7. do-nothing reblogged this from itsfullofstars
  8. geloscopicgnostic reblogged this from spaceplasma
  9. a-cali-guy-in-texass reblogged this from itsfullofstars
  10. lovelyuniversee reblogged this from itsfullofstars
  11. jvdbooks reblogged this from itsfullofstars
  12. lattaemint reblogged this from spaceplasma
  13. slowkingbreaker reblogged this from itsfullofstars
  14. thenerdkinginthenorth reblogged this from itsfullofstars
  15. mr-social-injustice reblogged this from itsfullofstars
  16. naoii reblogged this from itsfullofstars
  17. 7espace reblogged this from itsfullofstars
  18. nessun-dove reblogged this from itsfullofstars
  19. scifirusure reblogged this from spaceplasma
  20. arnabocean reblogged this from itsfullofstars
  21. fuckyeahcelestialthings reblogged this from spaceplasma
  22. deusadalua reblogged this from itsfullofstars
  23. iwanttobelieveintheimpala reblogged this from itsfullofstars
  24. bazinga6794 reblogged this from itsfullofstars
  25. brightestofcentaurus reblogged this from spaceplasma